Editorial

Thanks to everyone who has contributed, I am always very pleased to hear a new story.
Thanks also to all the visitors who have read any of the stories.

While reading please be sure to click on the comments links beneath the stories.

Tuesday, 14 October 2008

Story 10 from Paul Bridle

Story 10
I was born in Southlands Hospital, Shoreham-by-Sea on 8th November 1951 and lived with my parents in Lower Boundstone Lane, Lancing from then until later in the 1950s. My father was an architect and my mother a housewife. I attended Lancing Infants School and recall an air raid shelter in the grass playing field at the back of the school. I, along with the other pupils were too afraid to go down the steps to it.

My grandfather owned and ran Melhuish's Stores until he retired and moved to 25, Upper Boundstone Lane, where he lived until the early 1970s. I can remember the building of the school in Upper Boundstone Lane and the A27 'top road' My great grandfather who lived with my grandparents used to walk from their bungalow each morning up to the top road and back for exercise.

Does any one else remember the ex-army DUKW vehicle which used to take people out onto the sea?
At the time of the Cuban Missile Crisis I and my family were at my grandparents' beach hut when we saw a large cargo passing along the channel out to sea. It would seem that it was being shipped to Cuba by the Russians. I was blissfully unaware of the fear of war that so many people hat.
Reply from Paul Kidger

I still remember the excitement of seeing a Battle of Britain class steam train going over the level crossing in Lancing. Magnificent and a change from the electric trains.

In addition Paul writes..

I'd be pleased to hear from anyone who remembers my family in Lancing - My grandparents owner Melhuish's Stores in Sompting Road, which I think was called something like Myrtle Terrace or Parade. The shop was on the corner of Myrtle Road and Sompting Road. It was converted to a house, possibly in the 1970s.

Our family GP was Dr. Alexander (called "Dr. Alec"). He had a crease in one cheek from a bullet wound in WW1 when he was a fighter pilot.

Paul Bridle

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